Wanting to be Right

Being right too soon is socially unacceptable.

Robert A. Heinlein

The previous quotation from an esoteric French manuscript, when I first read it, resonated with me. It still does. Sometimes words in another language can do this, better.

Many people want to be right, whatever that means. They want to “win” the argument, it is a compulsion, and some set much stock on this “being right” thing. It is odd. When they are wrong they don’t usually suffer physical plane death, they may be embarrassed. You can observe when someone is caught in the “I am right” loop, it iterates, and it iterates.

One of the social problems of intuition stems from seeing things too soon. Should you mention them, the “ I am right” do loop starts to execute in the minds of those obsessed by “being right”. Maybe some time later they go, at least if only to themselves, “Alan was right after all”. Rarely if ever has anyone actually said this to me. To do so would be to lose face.

To give an example of this at work. When I was a child in a small mines’ school in outback Australia, not doing so well in school because of my lousy handwriting, it lost marks, a babysitter asked me; “who is the brainiest in your class?”. I told them, “me”. They later told another child in my class what I had said. It got around school and I was tormented as a result. To my knowledge nobody else subsequently taught at a world top ten university from that class. I was, in this context, right too soon.

Similar episodes have played out on numerous occasions subsequently. People are convinced they are right, I say something to the contrary and some form of social penalty for me, follows. Often, though not always, that which I have intuited subsequently falls true. It is no wonder that I keep quiet and became more introverted. When someone is hell-bent on being right they lose auditory capability and the ability to assimilate anything which does not coincide exactly with whatever it is they are “right” about. That “I must win the argument” attitude is strong even if it means them effectively going; “la-la-la-la not listening”, like a child in the playground, metaphorically speaking.

There is no better sure-fire way of offending an already omniscient being than saying something which does not align exactly with their omniscience. I have seen this play out many times. I have something useful to add, stupidly I do so, offence and retribution follows. It is partially because of such dramas, that I find myself here.

A warrior has nothing to defend.

Most people have a huge bunch of stuff, rafts of opinions and their status as an “expert” to defend. Even if this means being close minded. Face and status get in the way.

I have yet to find away around this other than to hold my tongue. I can spot someone who is “wanting to be right” a mile off, these days. Have a look around you, can you recognise such as these? Are you one yourself? In the final analysis does “wanting to be right” bring equanimity, peace or freedom? What do you think? Is it possible to transcend this urge, this compulsion of, “wanting to be right”?