Excommunication

From Wikipedia:

“Excommunication is an institutional act of religious censure used to deprive, suspend, or limit membership in a religious community or to restrict certain rights within it, in particular receiving of the sacraments. The term is often historically used to refer specifically to Catholic excommunications from the Catholic Church, but it is also used more generally to refer to similar types of institutional religious exclusionary practices and shunning among other religious groups. For instance, many Protestant denominations have similar practices of excusing congregants from church communities, while Jehovah’s Witnesses, as well as the Churches of Christ, use the term “disfellowship” to refer to their form of excommunication. The Amish have also been known to excommunicate members that were either seen or known for breaking rules, or questioning the church.

The word excommunication means putting a specific individual or group out of communion. In some denominations, excommunication includes spiritual condemnation of the member or group. Excommunication may involve banishment, shunning, and shaming, depending on the group, the offense that caused excommunication, or the rules or norms of the religious community. The grave act is often revoked in response to sincere penance, which may be manifested through public recantation, sometimes through the Sacrament of Confession, piety or through mortification of the flesh.”

St Columba
Robert II of France
Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor was excommunicated 4 times
King John of England
Pedro the Cruel of Navarre
Robert the Bruce
John Wycliffe
Saint Joan of Arc
Martin Luther
James IV of Scotland
Henry VIII of England
Thomas Cranmer
Napoleon
Juan Perón
Fidel Castro